British Conservative Party Propaganda

An interesting collection of reproduction vintage Conservative Party posters,
 faithfully reproduced by World of Art and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish which reduces the gloss effect allowing for a wider perspective of the image from different angles. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. Using high quality inks for a longer lasting effect you can be assured your poster will be with you for years to come. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border. We have over 12,000 posters in stock so please do check back in regularly for new items as we list them as quickly as possible.
Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters order

Standard A3 Size
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16.53" x 11.69"
42cm x 29.7cm
420mm x 297mm
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The Conservative Party traces its origins to a faction, rooted in the 18th century Whig Party, that coalesced around William Pitt the Younger (Prime Minister of Great Britain 1783 -1801 and 1804 -1806). They were known as "Independent Whigs", "Friends of Mr Pitt", or "Pittites". After Pitt's death the term "Tory" came into use. This was an allusion to the Tories, a political grouping that had existed from 1678, but which had no organisational continuity with the Pittite party. From about 1812 on the name "Tory" was commonly used for the newer party.
The term "Conservative" was suggested as a title for the party by a magazine article by J. Wilson Croker in the Quarterly Review in 1830. The name immediately caught on and was officially adopted under the aegis of Sir Robert Peel around 1834. Peel is acknowledged as the founder of the Conservative Party, which he created with the announcement of the Tamworth Manifesto. The term "Conservative Party" rather than Tory was the dominant usage by 1845.

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