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De dissectione partium corporis humani libri tres, Charles Estienne, reproduction prints by World of Art

De dissectione partium corporis humani libri tres, France, 1545, Charles Estienne

An interesting collection of reproduction antique anatomical prints from 16th century France, all faithfully reproduced by World of Art and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish and high quality inks to retain colour vibrancy for years to come. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border
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Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters

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Standard A3 Size
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16.53" x 11.69"
42cm x 29.7cm
420mm x 297mm
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Charles Estienne (1504-1564) was an early exponent of the science of anatomy in France. Éstienne appears to have been the first to detect valves in the orifice of the hepatic veins. He was ignorant, however, of the researches of the Italian anatomists; and his description of the brain is inferior to that given sixty years before by Alessandro Achillini. His comparison of the cerebral cavities to the human ear has persuaded F. Portal that he knew the inferior cornua, the hippocampus and its prolongations; but this is no reason for giving him that honour to the detriment of the reputation of Achillini, to whom, so far as historical testimony goes, the first knowledge of this fact is due. The researches of Éstienne into the structure of the nervous system are, however, neither useless nor inglorious; and the circumstance of demonstrating a canal through the entire length of the spinal cord, which had neither been suspected by contemporaries nor noticed by successors till Jean-Baptiste de Sénac (1693-1770) made it known, is sufficient to place him high in the rank of anatomical discoverers.