De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem reproduction prints by World of Art — World of Art Global Limited Skip to content
Just in! The Mihály Biró Collection
Just in! The Mihály Biró Collection
De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem, Italy, 1543, Andreas Vesalius, reproduction prints by World of Art

De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem by Andreas Vesalius, Italy, 1543

An interesting collection of reproduction antique anatomical prints from 16th century Italy, all faithfully reproduced by World of Art and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish and high quality inks to retain colour vibrancy for years to come. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border
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Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters

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Standard A3 Size
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16.53" x 11.69"
42cm x 29.7cm
420mm x 297mm
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De humani corporis fabrica libri septem (Latin for "On the fabric of the human body in seven books") is a set of books on human anatomy written by Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) and published in 1543. It represented a major advance in the history of anatomy. The collection of books is based on his Paduan lectures, during which he deviated from common practice by dissecting a corpse to illustrate what he was discussing. Dissections had previously been performed by a barber surgeon under the direction of a doctor of medicine, who was not expected to perform manual labour. Vesalius's magnum opus presents a careful examination of the organs and the complete structure of the human body. This would not have been possible without the many advances that had been made during the Renaissance, including artistic developments in literal visual representation and the technical development of printing with refined woodcut engravings. Because of these developments and his careful, immediate involvement, Vesalius was able to produce illustrations superior to any produced previously.