Édouard Vuillard

The Édouard Vuillard Collection by World of Art, reproductions of classic post-impressionism, pointillism and Impressionism, faithfully reproduced and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish which reduces the gloss effect allowing for a wider perspective of the image from different angles. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. Using high quality inks for a longer lasting effect you can be assured your poster will be with you for years to come. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border. We have over 12,000 posters in stock so please do check back in regularly for new items as we list them as quickly as possible.

Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters

Standard A3 Size
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16.53" x 11.69"
42cm x 29.7cm
420mm x 297mm
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Your custom is appreciated
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Jean-Édouard Vuillard, 1868 to 1940, was a French painter and printmaker associated with the Nabis. He studied at the Lycée Condorcet. In 1887, after three unsuccessful attempts, Vuillard passed the entrance examination for the École des Beaux-Arts. By 1890, the year in which Vuillard met Pierre Bonnard and Paul Sérusier, he had joined the Nabis, a group of art students inspired by the synthetism of Gauguin. He contributed to their exhibitions at the Gallery of Le Barc de Boutteville, and later shared a studio with fellow Nabis Bonnard and Maurice Denis. In the early 1890s, he worked for the Théâtre de l'Œuvre of Lugné-Poe designing settings and programs. Vuillard first exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants of 1901 and at the Salon d'Automne in 1903. In the 1890s Vuillard met the brothers Alexandre and Thadée Natanson, the founders of La Revue Blanche, a cultural review. Vuillardʹs graphics appeared in the journal, together with Pierre Bonnard, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Félix Vallotton and others. In his paintings and decorative pieces, Vuillard depicted mostly interiors, streets, and gardens. Marked by a gentle humor, they are executed in the delicate range of soft, blurred colors characteristic of his art. Living with his mother, a dressmaker, until the age of sixty, Vuillard was very familiar with interior and domestic spaces. Much of his art reflected this influence, largely decorative and often depicting very intricate patterns. In 1912, Vuillard painted Théodore Duret in his Study, a commissioned portrait that signaled a new phase in Vuillard's work, which was dominated by portraiture from 1920 onwards

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