Giacomo Balla Reproduction Vintage Futurism Posters by World of Art — World of Art Global Limited Skip to content
JUST IN! . . . Sophie Tauber-Arp. The World of Art Collection
JUST IN! . . . Sophie Tauber-Arp. The World of Art Collection
Giacomo Balla classic Futurism posters by World of Art

Giacomo Balla

A small but fascinating collection from a key proponent of Futurism, Giacomo Balla, all faithfully reproduced and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish and high quality inks to retain colour vibrancy for years to come. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process.  All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border
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Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters 
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Standard A3 Size
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16.53" x 11.69"
42cm x 29.7cm
420mm x 297mm
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Thank you for ordering from us
Your custom is appreciated
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Giacomo Balla was born in Turin, in the Piedmont region of Italy. He was the son of a photographer and as a child studied music. At the age nine, after the death of his father, he gave up music and began working in a lithograph print shop. By age 20, his interest in visual art had developed to such a level that he decided to study painting at local academies, and several of his early works were shown at exhibitions. Following academic studies at the University of Turin, Balla moved to Rome in 1895, where he met and later married Elisa Marcucci. For several years he worked in Rome as an illustrator, caricaturist and portrait painter. In 1899, his work was exhibited at the Venice Biennale, and in the ensuing years his art was shown at major exhibitions in Rome and Venice, as well as in Munich, Berlin and Düsseldorf, at the Salon d'Automne in Paris, and at galleries in Rotterdam. Around 1902, he taught Divisionist techniques to Umberto Boccioni and Gino Severini. Influenced by Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Giacomo Balla adopted the Futurism style, creating a pictorial depiction of light, movement and speed. He was a signatory of the Futurist Manifesto in 1910, and he began to design Futurist furniture, as well as so-called Futurist "antineutral" clothing. Typical for his new style of painting is Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash in 1912.