Persian and Islamic art posters by World of Art — World of Art Global Limited Skip to content
Just in! The Mihály Biró Collection
Just in! The Mihály Biró Collection
Persian and Islamic art posters by World of Art

Persian and Islamic Art

An extensive collection of Persian and Islamic art,all faithfully reproduced by World of Art on 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish and high quality inks to retain colour vibrancy for years to come. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border
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Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters
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Standard A3 Size
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16.53" x 11.69"
42cm x 29.7cm
420mm x 297mm
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Thank you for ordering from us
Your custom is appreciated
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Islamic art encompasses the visual arts produced from the 7th century onward by people who lived within the territory that was inhabited by or ruled by culturally Islamic populations. It is thus a very difficult art to define because it covers many lands and various peoples over some 1,400 years; it is not art specifically of a religion, or of a time, or of a place, or of a single medium like painting. The huge field of Islamic architecture is the subject of a separate article, leaving fields as varied as calligraphy, painting, glass, pottery, and textiles, among others. Islamic art is not at all restricted to religious art, but includes all the art of the rich and varied cultures of Islamic societies as well. It frequently includes secular elements and elements that are frowned upon, if not forbidden, by some Islamic theologians. Apart from the ever-present calligraphic inscriptions, specifically religious art is actually less prominent in Islamic art than in Western medieval art, with the exception of Islamic architecture where mosques and their complexes of surrounding buildings are the most common remains. Figurative painting may cover religious scenes, but normally in essentially secular contexts such as the walls of palaces or illuminated books of poetry.