Japan vintage travel poster reproductions by World of Art — World of Art Global Limited Skip to content
Just in! The Mihály Biró Collection
Just in! The Mihály Biró Collection
Japan vintage travel poster reproductions by World of Art

Japan

A charming collection of vintage Japanese travel posters. A fascinating collection from France's Jean-Léon Gérôme, all faithfully reproduced and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish and high quality inks to retain colour vibrancy for years to come. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process.  All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border
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Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters 
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Standard A3 Size
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16.53" x 11.69"
42cm x 29.7cm
420mm x 297mm
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Thank you for ordering from us
Your custom is appreciated
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The origins of early traditions of visits to picturesque sites are unclear, but early sight-seeing excursions was Matsuo Basho's 1689 trip to the then "far north" of Japan, which occurred not long after Hayashi Razan categorized the Three Views of Japan in 1643. During the Edo era of Japan, from around 1600 to the Meiji Restoration in 1867, travel was regulated within the country through the use of shukuba or post stations, towns where travelers had to present appropriate documentation. Despite these restrictions, porter stations and horse stables, as well as places for lodging and food were available on well-traveled routes. During this time, Japan was a closed country to foreigners, so no foreign tourism existed in Japan. Following the Meiji Restoration and the building of a national railroad network, tourism became more of an affordable prospect for domestic citizens and visitors from foreign countries could enter Japan legally. As early as 1887, government officials recognized the need for an organized system of attracting foreign tourists.