Edward Atkinson Hornel 'Summer', 1891, Scotland, Reproduction 200gsm A3 Vintage Classic Art Poster

World of Art

£6.99 

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Beautiful reproductions of classic art from one of Scotland's sons, Edward Atkinson Hornel, faithfully reproduced and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish reducing the gloss effect allowing for a wider perspective of the image from different angles. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. Using high quality inks for a longer lasting effect you can be assured your poster will be with you for years to come. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border. We have over 12,000 posters in stock so please do check back in regularly for new items as we list them as quickly as possible.

Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters

Standard A3 Size

16.53" x 11.69"

42cm x 29.7cm

420mm x 297mm

Thank you for ordering from us

Your custom is appreciated

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Edward Atkinson Hornel, (1864-1933) was a Scottish painter of landscapes, flowers, and foliage, with children. Born in Bacchus Marsh, Victoria Australia, of Scottish parents, he was brought up and lived practically all his life in Scotland after his family moved back to Kirkcudbright in 1866. He studied for three years at the art school at Edinburgh, and for two years at Antwerp under Professor Verlat. Returning from Antwerp in 1885, he met George Henry and associated himself with the Glasgow Boys. Hornel and Henry collaborated upon The Druids Bringing in the Mistletoe in 1890, a procession of Druidic priests bringing in the sacred mistletoe, gorgeous with polychrome and gold. The two worked side by side to achieve decorative splendor of color, Hornel boldly and freely employing texture effects produced by loading and scraping, roughening, smoothing, and staining. In 1893–94 the two artists spent a year and a half in Japan, where Hornel learned much about decorative design and spacing. Towards the close of the nineties his colors, while preserving their glow and richness, became more refined and more atmospheric, and his drawing more naturalistic, combining sensuous appeal with emotional and poetic significance. In 1901 he declined election to the Royal Scottish Academy. A member of Glasgow Art Club, Hornel exhibited in the club's annual exhibitions. In 1901 he acquired Broughton House, a townhouse and garden in Kirkcudbright, which was his main residence for the rest of his life with his sister Elizabeth. There he made several modifications to the house and designed garden taking inspiration from his travels in Japan. he also made an addition of a gallery for his paintings. On his death the house and library were donated for the benefit of the citizens and Broughton House is now administered by the National Trust for Scotland.

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