Franz Wilhelm Seiwert 'Der Lumpenball', Germany, 1930, Reproduction 20 — World of Art Global Limited Skip to content
Latest Collection: The Mihály Biró Collection
Latest Collection: The Mihály Biró Collection

Franz Wilhelm Seiwert 'Der Lumpenball', Germany, 1930, Reproduction 200gsm A3 Vintage Bauhaus Constructivism Art Poster

£6.99

A wonderful collection of vintage Bauhaus posters and related artwork, faithfully reproduced by World of Art and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish reducing the gloss effect allowing for wider perspective of the image from different angles. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border

Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters

Standard A3 Size

16.53" x 11.69"

42cm x 29.7cm

420mm x 297mm

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Your custom is appreciated

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Staatliches Bauhaus, commonly known simply as Bauhaus, meaning house of construction, operated from 1919 to 1933. It was founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar with the idea of creating a total work of art in which all arts, including architecture, would eventually be brought together. The Bauhaus style later became one of the most influential currents in modern design, Modernist architecture and art, design and architectural education. The Bauhaus had a profound influence upon subsequent developments in art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography. The school existed in three German cities: Weimar from 1919 to 1925, Dessau from 1925 to 1932 and Berlin from 1932 to 1933, under three different architect-directors: Walter Gropius from 1919 to 1928, Hannes Meyer from 1928 to 1930 and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe from 1930 until 1933, when the school was closed by its own leadership under pressure from the Nazi-led government which had claimed that it was a centre of communist intellectualism. Though the school was closed, the staff continued to spread its idealistic precepts as they left Germany and emigrated all over the world