Johannes Vermeer 'Lady at The Virginal with a Gentleman, The Music Les — World of Art Global Limited Skip to content
JUST IN! . . . Sophie Tauber-Arp. The World of Art Collection
JUST IN! . . . Sophie Tauber-Arp. The World of Art Collection

Johannes Vermeer 'Lady at The Virginal with a Gentleman, The Music Lesson', Detail', Netherlands, 1662, Reproduction 200gsm Vintage A3 Classic Art Poster

£6.99

A lovely little collection from Dutch Baroque Period Painter Johannes Vermeer, faithfully reproduced by World of Art and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish reducing the gloss effect allowing for a wider perspective of the image from different angles. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border.

Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters

Standard A3 Size

16.53" x 11.69"

42cm x 29.7cm

420mm x 297mm

Thank you for ordering from us

Your custom is appreciated

..

Johannes, Jan or Johan Vermeer (1632 – 1675) was a Dutch painter who specialized in domestic interior scenes of middle-class life. Vermeer was a moderately successful provincial genre painter in his lifetime. He evidently was not wealthy, leaving his wife and children in debt at his death, perhaps because he produced relatively few paintings. Vermeer worked slowly and with great care, and frequently used very expensive pigments. He is particularly renowned for his masterly treatment and use of light in his work. Vermeer painted mostly domestic interior scenes. "Almost all his paintings are apparently set in two smallish rooms in his house in Delft; they show the same furniture and decorations in various arrangements and they often portray the same people, mostly women." He was recognized during his lifetime in Delft and The Hague, but his modest celebrity gave way to obscurity after his death. He was barely mentioned in Arnold Houbraken's major source book on 17th-century Dutch painting (Grand Theatre of Dutch Painters and Women Artists), and was thus omitted from subsequent surveys of Dutch art for nearly two centuries. In the 19th century, Vermeer was rediscovered by Gustav Friedrich Waagen and Théophile Thoré-Bürger, who published an essay attributing 66 pictures to him, although only 34 paintings are universally attributed to him today. Since that time, Vermeer's reputation has grown, and he is now acknowledged as one of the greatest painters of the Dutch Golden Age