Laszlo Moholy-Nagy 'Lis, Detail', Hungary, 1922, Reproduction 200gsm A — World of Art Global Limited Skip to content
Latest Collection: The Mihály Biró Collection
Latest Collection: The Mihály Biró Collection

Laszlo Moholy-Nagy 'Lis, Detail', Hungary, 1922, Reproduction 200gsm A3 Vintage Classic Bauhaus Constructivism Poster

£7.99

An extensive and fascinating collection of Bauhaus and Constructivism posters from the legendary Hungarian Master László Moholy-Nagy, all faithfully reproduced by World of Art and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish and high quality inks to retain colour vibrancy for years to come. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border.

Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters

Standard A3 Size

16.53" x 11.69"

42cm x 29.7cm

420mm x 297mm

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Your custom is appreciated

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László Moholy-Nagy, 1895 to 1946 was a Hungarian painter and photographer as well as a professor in the Bauhaus school. He was highly influenced by constructivism and a strong advocate of the integration of technology and industry into the arts. In 1923, he replaced Johannes Itten as the instructor of the foundation course at the Bauhaus. This effectively marked the end of the school’s expressionistic leanings and moved it closer towards its original aims as a school of design and industrial integration. The Bauhaus became known for the versatility of its artists, and Moholy-Nagy was no exception. Throughout his career, he became proficient and innovative in the fields of photography, typography, sculpture, painting, printmaking, and industrial design. One of his main focuses was photography. He coined the term “the New Vision” for his belief that photography could create a whole new way of seeing the outside world that the human eye could not. His theory of art and teaching is summed up in the book The New Vision, from Material to Architecture. He experimented with the photographic process of exposing light sensitive paper with objects overlain on top of it, called photogram. While studying at the Bauhaus, Moholy’s teaching in diverse media — including painting, sculpture, photography, photomontage and metal — had a profound influence on a number of his students, including Marianne Brandt. He resigned from the Bauhaus early in 1928 and worked free-lance as a highly sought-after designer in Berlin. He designed stage sets for successful and controversial operatic and theatrical productions, designed exhibitions and books, created ad campaigns, wrote articles and made films. His studio employed artists and designers such as Istvan Seboek, Gyorgy Kepes and Andor Weininger. After the Nazis came to power in Germany in 1933, and, as a foreign citizen, he was no longer allowed to work, he operated for a time in the Netherlands before moving to London in 1935. In 1937, at the invitation of Walter Paepcke, the Chairman of the Container Corporation of America, Moholy-Nagy moved to Chicago to become the director of the New Bauhaus. The philosophy of the school was basically unchanged from that of the original, and its headquarters was the Prairie Avenue mansion that architect Richard Morris Hunt designed for department store magnate Marshall Field. Unfortunately, the school lost the financial backing of its supporters after only a single academic year, and it closed in 1938. Moholy-Nagy was also the Art Advisor for the mail-order house of Spiegel in Chicago. Paepcke, however, continued his own support, and in 1939, Moholy-Nagy opened the School of Design. In 1944, this became the Institute of Design. In 1949 the Institute of Design became a part of Illinois Institute of Technology and became the first institution in the United States to offer a PhD in design. Moholy-Nagy authored an account of his efforts to develop the curriculum of the School of Design in his book Vision in Motion. He died of leukemia in Chicago in 1946.