Vintage Anatomy Phrenology 'The Centre of Physical Phenonema', from 'V — World of Art Global Limited Skip to content
Latest Collection: The Mihály Biró Collection
Latest Collection: The Mihály Biró Collection

Vintage Anatomy Phrenology 'The Centre of Physical Phenonema', from 'Vaught's Practical Character Reader', U.S.A, 1902, Reproduction 200gsm A3 Vintage Medical Poster

£7.99

An interesting collection of reproduction Victorian 19th century Phrenology artwork, faithfully reproduced by World of Art on 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish and high quality inks to retain colour vibrancy for years to come. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border

Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters 

Standard A3 Size

16.53" x 11.69"

42cm x 29.7cm

420mm x 297mm

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Phrenology, meaning "mind", and "knowledge" is a pseudo-medicine primarily focused on measurements of the human skull, based on the concept that the brain is the organ of the mind, and that certain brain areas have localized, specific functions or modules. Although both of those ideas have a basis in reality, phrenology extrapolated beyond empirical knowledge in a way that departed from science. Developed by German physician Franz Joseph Gall in 1796, the discipline was very popular in the 19th century, especially from about 1810 until 1840. The principal British centre for phrenology was Edinburgh, where the Edinburgh Phrenological Society was established in 1820. Although now regarded as an obsolete amalgamation of primitive neuroanatomy with moral philosophy, phrenological thinking was influential in 19th-century psychiatry. Gall's assumption that character, thoughts, and emotions are located in specific parts of the brain is considered an important historical advance toward neuropsychology.