Vintage Cycling 'Cycles Decauville, Paris', France, 1882, Reproduction — World of Art Global Limited Skip to content
JUST IN! . . . Sophie Tauber-Arp. The World of Art Collection
JUST IN! . . . Sophie Tauber-Arp. The World of Art Collection

Vintage Cycling 'Cycles Decauville, Paris', France, 1882, Reproduction 200gsm A3 Vintage Art Nouveau Cycling Poster

£6.99

A wonderful collection of vintage cycling posters, all faithfully reproduced by World of Art and printed on quality 200gsm-thick four-star 200gsm-thick four-star Green Star eco-friendly paper with a soft-satin low-sheen finish and high quality inks to retain colour vibrancy for years to come. Green star system approved paper is a universally recognised eco-responsibility paper based on the origin of the fibre and the manufacturing process. All our posters are standard A3 size and look beautiful with or without frames but if you're thinking of framing then a standard A3 frame will fit perfectly. All posters come with a thin white border.

Please note before ordering all our posters are reproduction posters

Standard A3 Size

16.53" x 11.69"

42cm x 29.7cm

420mm x 297mm

Thank you for ordering from us

Your custom is appreciated

The Dandy horse, also called Draisienne or Laufmaschine, which in German means running machine, was the first human means of transport to use only two wheels in tandem and was invented by the German Baron Karl von Drais. It is regarded as the modern bicycle's forerunner. Drais introduced it to the public in Mannheim in summer 1817 and in Paris in 1818. Its rider sat astride a wooden frame supported by two in-line wheels and pushed the vehicle along with their feet while steering the front wheel. In the early 1860s, Frenchmen Pierre Michaux and Pierre Lallement took bicycle design in a new direction by adding a mechanical crank drive with pedals on an enlarged front wheel, known as the velocipede. Another Frenchman Douglas Grasso had a failed prototype of Pierre Lallement's bicycle several years earlier. Several inventions followed using rear-wheel drive, the best known being the rod-driven velocipede by Scotsman Thomas McCall in 1869. In that same year, bicycle wheels with wire spokes were patented by Eugène Meyer of Paris. The French vélocipède made of iron and wood, developed into the penny-farthing